Nelson Mandela: tributes and reaction to his death - live updates

时间:2019-09-08
作者:令狐枉

Summary

We're going to wrap up our live blog coverage for the day. Here's a summary of where things stand:

Tributes to Nelson Mandela unfolded around the world. In South Africa, mourners and celebrants  in Soweto and outside the Johannesburg home where Mandela died. Flags flew at  in the world's capitals. Words of admiration flowed from , of , , , the  and many others including .

Mandela's 15 December funeral is expected to be one of the biggest global gatherings of powerful people in modern history. Read Guardian diplomatic editor Julian Borger .

 will take place on 10 December at the FNB stadium in Johannesburg - the site of the 2010 World Cup final. Mandela's body will lie instate at the Union Buildings in Pretoria, Zuma for three days from 11 December. 

The Associated Press its coverage of Mandela's February 1990 release from prison: "Nelson Mandela walked through a prison gate to freedom Sunday, setting set off joyous celebrations and violent clashes as blacks nationwide welcomed their leader back from 27 years in jail," the piece begins.

ABC News' Terry Moran is en route to South Africa:

Terry Moran (@TerryMoran)

On my flight to , captain asks for a moment of silence "for our beloved Madiba." After, someone says: "May God rest his soul."

"World leaders are preparing to converge in unprecedented numbers on South Africa for 's funeral, likely to be one of the biggest global gatherings of powerful people in modern history," Guardian diplomatic editor Julian Borger :

Barack Obama will fly in, with his wife Michelle, as well as former US presidents. Britain is expected to send senior royals, presumably Prince Charles, and possibly Prince William as well as the prime minister, David Cameron.

They are likely to mix in the funeral cortege with leaders from across the globe, including from China, Iran, Cuba, Israel and the Palestinian territories. It is not clear how Syria will be represented, or whether Sudan's president Omar al-Bashir, charged with genocide by the international criminal court, will attend.

As well as creating a minefield of chance encounters to avoid, the convergence of such an array of presidents and prime ministers should also offer unusual diplomatic opportunities. The spirit of reconciliation Mandela embodied could provide, for example, the backdrop for a first meeting between Obama and Iranian leader, Hassan Rouhani.

Read the .

A man in Dublin reads about the death of Nelson Mandela.
A man in Dublin reads about the death of Nelson Mandela. Photograph: Matt Boster/REX

The Economist has produced a of the Nelson Mandela story.

Read "Apartheid's Useful Idiots" by Ta-Nehisi Coates :

For many years, a large swath of this country failed Nelson Mandela, failed its own alleged morality, and failed the majority of people living in South Africa. We have some experience with this. Still, it's easy to forget William F. Buckley—intellectual founder of the modern right—effectively :

Read the .

"The top-selling Dutch newspaper has apologized for a story on its website that linked the death of anti-apartheid icon with a controversial black-face character in the traditional Dutch celebration of Sinterklaas," the Associated Press reports:

In the opening sentence of an article collating reactions to Mandela's death, De Telegraaf said Friday that Mandela "died on the very night of St. Nicholas (with Black Pete)."

Black Pete is the helper of Saint Nicholas, known in the Netherlands as Sinterklaas, who brings children gifts on Dec. 5. Black Pete traditionally is portrayed by people in black-face makeup.

The character has been the focus of a fierce debate in the Netherlands recently between fans of the Sinterklaas tradition and opponents who call Black Pete a racist throwback.

The Telegraaf blamed the "tasteless link" on "an unfortunate convergence of circumstances."

Updated

Johannesburg journalist Natasha Joseph, , describes competing viewpoints on Mandela in South Africa:

I've never met a South African who is ambivalent about Nelson Mandela.

To those who cling to him as a sort of talisman, he is an icon, a deity sent down to save us from ourselves. He is Jesus Christ returned, walking among South Africans of all races and guiding us through the frightening dying days of apartheid. Just more than 20 years ago, he was weeks from becoming president and one of his closest allies, South African Communist Party Secretary General Chris Hani, was assassinated at his Gauteng home by a white right-winger. Tens of thousands of South Africans, most of them black, took to the streets of major cities in an outpouring of public grief and rage. Mandela went on national television and told South Africans about Hani's white neighbor who phoned the police to describe the gunman. He called for calm. It worked. This is the Mandela who is invoked by the faithful, the devotees who insist he alone averted a civil war and saved countless white lives.

Read the .

Further Mandela listening: "Prayer for Mandela" by Lovemore Majaivana and the Zulu Band.

The Associated Press has republished its coverage of Mandela's release from prison in February 1990, with this editor's note:

EDITOR'S NOTE On Feb. 11, 1990, AP reporter Greg Myre was in Cape Town when Nelson Mandela was released from prison after 27 years. Mandela walked out of Victor Verster prison hand-in-hand with his then wife, Winnie, as people worldwide rejoiced. The momentous event rivaled the fall of the Berlin Wall just a few months earlier as a symbol of newfound freedom. Twenty-three years after its original publication, the AP is making this story available to its subscribers.

Here's the top of the story: 

CAPE TOWN, South (AP) Nelson Mandela walked through a prison gate to freedom Sunday, setting set off joyous celebrations and violent clashes as blacks nationwide welcomed their leader back from 27 years in jail.
"Comrades and fellow South Africans, I greet you all in the name of peace, democracy and freedom for all," Mandela told tens of thousands of cheering supporters who thronged outside City Hall at twilight, many getting their first look at the 71-year-old African National Congress leader.
But he emphatically reaffirmed his commitment to the ANC's guerrilla campaign and called for increased pressure to end white-minority domination - the same cause that resulted in his life sentence on charges of plotting against the government. He also reiterated that talks with the government cannot begin until it lifts the state of emergency.
"I stand here before you not as a prophet, but as a humble servant of you the people," said the white-haired Mandela, who looked much more an elder statesman in his suit and tie than a guerrilla leader.
"Today, the majority of South Africans, black and white, recognize that apartheid has no future. It has to be ended by our decisive mass action," he said in a rousing half-hour speech frequently interrupted by roars of "Viva 3/8"
"We have waited too long for our freedom."

Read the full .

Read "Nelson Mandela: we are blessed to have shared our lifetime with a colossus" by Justice Malala :

Let us celebrate him. This is not a time to weep. This is a time to celebrate a life well lived, a man who stood fearful – like the rest of us – at the door of history and yet chose to brave the storm. We are blessed beyond measure to have shared a lifetime with such a colossus of the human spirit. [...]

As we all suddenly sat up and waited months ago, it was Max du Preez (an Afrikaner liberal former newspaper editor), who reminded us of the tragedy of death, and the dignity of the man. He told of an old Afrikaans saying: Stil, broers, daar gaan 'n man verby. (Silence, brothers, a man is passing by).

Read the . 

Read Hendrik Hertzberg on Mandela's electoral legacy:

A moral and political giant like Nelson Mandela seldom appears more than once or twice in a hundred years. In the twentieth century, the only fully comparable figure who comes immediately to mind is Mohandas K. Gandhi, whose work in South Africa foreshadowed Mandela’s. Looking at the nineteenth century, one thinks of Abraham Lincoln.

And in the eighteenth century? Mandela has often been called the George Washington of his country, and justly so. But he was also South Africa’s James Madison.

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Updated

There are many condolences books for Mandela around the world, including in Toronto. 

Daniel Dale (@ddale8)

Mayor Ford prepares to sign the condolence book for Mandela.

"THANK YOU FOR HELPING THE WORLD!" mayor Rob Ford wrote. "YOU WILL BE MISSED." Picture

More Mandela in Iran, via Saeed Kamali Dehghan:

Saeed Kamali Dehghan (@SaeedKD)

MT : Post-revolutionary big supporter of , got an honourary PhD in a 1992 Tehran visit:

The Guardian's Afua Hirsch (@) has gathered reaction from West Africa. "As the African Union paid tribute to a 'pan-African icon'," Afua writes, "across the continent, Africans were speaking in terms of sacrifice and liberation that have rarely been heard since the era of independence struggles":

“Madiba, as he was fondly known, symbolises the spirit of pan-Africanism and solidarity in the struggles of humanity against apartheid, oppression and colonialism and for self-determination, peace and reconciliation,” said Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, chair of the African Union Commission of the 54-member bloc, herself a South African and the former wife of President Jacob Zuma.

“Mandela has fought a good fight, and bowed out with great reverence.”

In West Africa, where a pan-African movement against colonial rule developed momentum in the 1940s and 50s, years before Nelson Mandela and the ANC fought against apartheid, many said they were deeply affected by the injustice of apartheid.

K.B. Asante, former diplomat and an appointee in the government of Kwame Nkrumah – Ghana’s first black government – said that it was difficult for people now to appreciate what it meant for someone who had been imprisoned for so many years not to have been bitter.

“There was a time when I personally never expected to see South Africa free in my lifetime,” said Asante. “I was really shocked in a way when Mandela became president and he sort of outlined his method of what to do for his country.”

The UN general assembly holds a moment of silence for Nelson Mandela. The US ambassador to the United Nations, Samantha Power, tweets a grainy image:

Samantha Power (@AmbassadorPower)

Moving moment of silence in . One thing all countries can agree: Nelson Mandela was a great and good man.

Summary

Here's a summary of where things stand.

Tributes to Nelson Mandela unfolded around the world. In South Africa, mourners and celebrants  in Soweto and outside the Johannesburg home where Mandela died. Flags flew at in the world's capitals. Words of admiration flowed from , of , , , the and many others including .

President Obama and the first lady will travel to South Africa next week to pay tribute to Mandela, the White House .

 Mandela's funeral will be held on Sunday 15 December. He will be buried in Qunu, the village in eastern Cape where he was born. The text of South African president Jacob Zuma's announcement of funeral arrangements .

Police are guarding access to the military hospital in Pretoria that received Mandela's body Friday morning,

Archbishop emeritus Desmond Tutu led a  in Cape Town Friday. "Let us give him the gift of a South Africa united, one," Tutu said.

Updated

NPR has put together a , spanning the split-tone singing he heard as a child to the African Jazz Pioneers to tribute songs recorded during his imprisonment. This song made the list:

Daniel Howden describes the scene outside Mandela's home in the Johannesburg suburb of Houghton. Earlier Daniel sent an of celebrations at the scene:

The crowds milling about the streets of Houghton where Mr Mandela lived in recent years with his third wife, Graca Machel, were a snapshot of South Africa as it would like to advertise itself -- affluent and colour blind. 

A small troupe of singers massed in the junction outside the high walls of his home, while tourists mingled with ruling ANC part activists, while parents sporting iPads and toddlers wandered past.

Muslims as well as Christians of several denominations rubbed shoulders with orthodox jews in kippah prayer caps, as people laid floral tributes and took pictures.

Muhammad Hajat and Faraz Isher had walked from their homes nearby to be part of what they felt to be a celebration of the former president's life.

"Standing here I can see the unity that he gave us," said Hajat, 22. "Instead of grieving Nelson Mandela we are celebrating him and it's amazing to be here."

His friend added: "It will be more difficult without him. It has been lost, his vision, but in moments like this you can see it again."

Anton Borras, a Catholic priest from the nearby diocese, who stood chatting to streethawkers selling ANC paraphernalia and Mandela badges said he had come to pray for a man he saw as an "instrument of God".

"For those who have faith he was a miracle," said the Spanish-born priest. "For those without, he surpassed all human expectation."

Obamas to travel to Africa

The White House has announced that President Obama and the first lady will travel to South Africa next week to pay their respects to Mandela, the AP reports. 

The Associated Press (@AP)

BREAKING: Obama, first lady to travel to South Africa next week to pay respects to Nelson Mandela.

In a trip to South Africa last June, the Obamas met privately with Mandela family members, but did not visit the hospital where Mandela was recuperating from a lung ailment. 

Updated

We've assembled a collection of front pages from around the world – view the show of .

Tom McCarthy (@TeeMcSee)

Today's Guardian cover:

Pictures

The Guardian photo desk has a running of the most striking images around the world of Nelson Mandela tributes. Here's a separate selection:

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff (2nd L), FIFA President Sepp Blatter (2nd R), actor Rodrigo Hilbert and model Fernanda Lima stand on stage as a tribute to former South African President Nelson Mandela is shown on the screen during the draw for the 2014 World Cup at the Costa do Sauipe resort in Sao Joao da Mata, Bahia state, December 6, 2013. The 2014 World Cup finals will be held in Brazil from June 12 through July 13.
Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff (2nd L), FIFA President Sepp Blatter (2nd R), actor Rodrigo Hilbert and model Fernanda Lima stand on stage as a tribute to former South African President Nelson Mandela is shown on the screen during the draw for the 2014 World Cup at the Costa do Sauipe resort in Sao Joao da Mata, Bahia state, December 6, 2013. The 2014 World Cup finals will be held in Brazil from June 12 through July 13. Photograph: SERGIO MORAES/REUTERS
1962, London, England, UK --- South African anti-apartheid activist, revolutionary and politician Nelson Mandela on visit to London.
1962, London, England, UK --- South African anti-apartheid activist, revolutionary and politician Nelson Mandela on visit to London. Photograph: Mary Benson/Felicity Brian Literary Agency/Sygma/Corbis
South African mourners sing and dance infront of the Cape Town City Hall where the late South African president Nelson Mandela made his first public address after being released in Cape Town, South Africa, 06 December 2013.
South African mourners sing and dance infront of the Cape Town City Hall where the late South African president Nelson Mandela made his first public address after being released in Cape Town, South Africa, 06 December 2013. Photograph: NIC BOTHMA/EPA

Great photo of the US Capitol.

Frank Thorp V (@frankthorpNBC)

The flags on Capitol Hill fly at half staff in memory of Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela is not done being a controversial figure in US politics, as a visitor last night to Texas Senator Ted Cruz' would have discovered. Cruz posted this tribute to Mandela:

纳尔逊曼德拉将作为全球自由维护者的灵感来生活在历史中。 几十年来,他坚持这样的原则:在所有南非人享有平等自由之前,他不会自己离开监狱,在他的自传中宣称:“自由是不可分割的; 我的任何一个人的锁链都是